problem loading posts

For a meat eater accustomed to choosing free-range over battery chickens, the sight of a seething, twitching mass of brown legs and antennae on the floor of Big Cricket Farms raises a tricky question: Are these crickets happy living in a fibreglass trough? How would one even know?

Nicola Twilley, ‘Big Cricket' (2014)

So Meta from A N F on Vimeo.

eyebeam.org/events/island-physics
Chris Woebken, Sascha Pohflepp and Andreas Nicolas Fischer will spend their time on Governors Island commissioning a series of computer simulations that will run within a meticulous virtual recreation of Building 15. The individual simulations are being created by a selection of 3D artists who form part of a community that is exploring the aesthetics of simulation in the context of contemporary computer graphics, often disseminating their work on social media rather than in an academic context. These participating artists include:

Kai Kostack: youtube.com/user/KaiKostack
Mohamad (Moby Motion) Zeina: youtube.com/user/moby1toby
Andreas Nicolas (ANF6000) Fischer: anf.nu
Gottfried (BlenderDiplom) Hofmann: youtube.com/user/BlenderDiplom
Tayfun (blazraidr) Ozdemir: youtube.com/user/blazraidr

Island Physics will turn Eyebeam’s house on Governors Island into a testing-ground for alternate realities, simulating the impossible in a living room.

Cannot stop looking at these new Roger Hiorns foam sculptures. 14 of them will end up in our drone show 'A screaming comes across the sky', that opens at LABoral in Gijón on 10 October.

From the exhibition description:

Roger Hiorns’ Untitled sculptures are a gathering of bodies hanging from the ceiling that produce a never-ending stream of foam out of thin air. The sculptures contain ordinary bath foam, and air is generated from a small network of air compressors. Over time, pillars of foam slowly rise from the top.

The sculptures have a haunting beauty to them, drawing the viewer in, albeit with an eerie sense of alertness and a hint of dread. Together, they ”suggest a sort of independence,” says art critic JJ Charlesworth, “a separation from the world of those who see them, as if they have a purpose, or at least a story behind their existence, that exists despite the context in which they are encountered.”

The process of seemingly purposeless and endless creation and destruction are a poetic reflection on the networks drones rely upon. The sculptures could be seen as both the drones, as the mutilated bodies left after the network has struck.

All photos courtesy of Roger Hiorns and Corvi Mora Gallery, London.

Futures? a short interview with Warren Ellis

I think it’s important to look at the present moment with clear eyes and understand the wonder of a contemporary context where we can see the glass lakes of Titan and satellites orbiting the sun can report to our phones. Or even that several thousand years of developing communication technology means that I can type this right now and you’ll see it in seconds. We tend not to see it. We’re conditioned to see the present moment as “normal,” with all the banality that implies. This is not a banal moment. It’s the sort of intense, chaotic moment, full of strange things, that we previously only found in science fiction. “Right now” feels like all of science fiction happening at once, and needs to be considered in that context — that we’re living in that promised world of miracles and wonder, and that we’ve been trained by the culture not to see it.
http://www.nicolasnova.net/pasta-and-vinegar/2014/9/14/futures-interview-warren-ellis

Artist Stops Oil Pipeline Cold

Alberta artist, Peter von Tiesenhausen, has effectively stopped oil corporations from putting a pipeline through his 800 acre property by covering it with artwork and copyrighting the top six inches of his land as an artwork. Realizing that mining companies can legitimately lay claim to any land underneath private property to a depth of six inches, van Tiesenhausen contacted a lawyer who drew up an intellectual property/copyright claim that said that if the oil company disturbed the top six inches in any way, it would be a copyright violation.
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/05/30/1303087/-Artist-Stops-Oil-Pipeline-Cold
This is the first image ever taken from the surface of Mars of an overcast sky. Featured are stratus clouds coming from the northeast at about 15 miles per hour (6.7 meters/second) at an approximate height of ten miles (16 kilometers) above the surface. The “you are here” notation marks where Earth was situated in the sky at the time the image was taken. Scientists had hoped to see Earth in this image, but the cloudy conditions prevented a clear viewing. Similar images will be taken in the future with the hope of capturing a view of Earth. From Mars, Earth would appear as a tiny blue dot similar to how a star would appear to an earthbound observer. Pathfinders’ imaging system will not be able to resolve Earths’ moon. The clouds consist of water ice condensed on reddish dust particles suspended in the atmosphere. Clouds on Mars are sometimes localized and can sometimes cover entire regions, but have not yet been observed to cover the entire planet. The image was taken about an hour and forty minutes before sunrise by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 16 at about ten degrees up from the eastern Martian horizon. (via http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/MPF/science/clouds.html )

This is the first image ever taken from the surface of Mars of an overcast sky. Featured are stratus clouds coming from the northeast at about 15 miles per hour (6.7 meters/second) at an approximate height of ten miles (16 kilometers) above the surface. The “you are here” notation marks where Earth was situated in the sky at the time the image was taken. Scientists had hoped to see Earth in this image, but the cloudy conditions prevented a clear viewing. Similar images will be taken in the future with the hope of capturing a view of Earth. From Mars, Earth would appear as a tiny blue dot similar to how a star would appear to an earthbound observer. Pathfinders’ imaging system will not be able to resolve Earths’ moon. The clouds consist of water ice condensed on reddish dust particles suspended in the atmosphere. Clouds on Mars are sometimes localized and can sometimes cover entire regions, but have not yet been observed to cover the entire planet. The image was taken about an hour and forty minutes before sunrise by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 16 at about ten degrees up from the eastern Martian horizon. (via http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/MPF/science/clouds.html )